Job Offers

INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Solar influences on climate via the stratospheric pathway"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Together with volcanic activity, solar variability is an important source of naturally forced variability of the Earth's climate. There is growing evidence that this influence is not restricted to the variable solar energy input at surface level but other aspects of solar variability could also affect climate via modulations of the stratospheric ozone layer. These are solar ultraviolet irradiance variations and energetic particle precipitation, recently included as input to climate model simulations in support of upcoming assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Ongoing research is focused around the following key questions: • What is the observed fingerprint of solar ultraviolet irradiance variability and energetic particle precipitation in atmospheric composition and dynamical parameters? • What are the mechanisms for solar signal transfer from the stratosphere to the surface? • How much do radiative and particle solar forcings change with time from daily to secular timescales? • What are the requisites for climate models to accurately describe solar forcing impacts? The Terrestrial-Planetary atmosphere group (GAPT) at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía - CSIC, Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence, has a long recognized trajectory in this field, which is reflected in the leadership role in international projects such as SOLARIS-HEPPA of SPARC. To answer these questions, we analyze satellite observations of atmospheric composition and temperature, as well as climate model simulations of different complexity. Coordinated model experiments and model validation studies with help of observational data are thereby of particular importance.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Imaging supermassive black holes with the Event Horizon Telescope"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Our research group at IAA is focused on the study of black hole accretion and relativistic jet formation through very long baseline interferometric observations (VLBI) with mm-wave arrays, such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), and orbiting antennas, such as the space VLBI mission RadioAstron. In particular our research group is playing a key role in the scientific exploitation of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). Dr. Gómez, the group leader, is one of the three coordinators of the EHT Imaging Working Group (WG), together with Kazu Akiyama (MIT) and Katherine Bouman (CalTech). The EHT Imaging WG comprises more than 100 researchers worldwide and is responsible for producing all the images obtained by the EHT. Gómez is also the PI of the RadioAstron Key Science Program to study jet formation in AGN jets. Dr. Zhao is one of the two leaders of the SMILI Imaging Team (one of the four Teams within the Imaging WG responsible to produce the EHT images), and one of the two coordinators for the Scattering WG. Dr. Lico is the Secretary of the EHT Management Team, and participates actively in multiple WGs, as well as PhD student Mr. Fuentes. Two more postdocs will join the group in 2021. Our research group has already become one of the most relevant in the EHT, and is playing a key role in the analysis of the EHT observations of SgrA*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, for which there are big expectations from the entire scientific community. The PhD student will greatly benefit from access to the only astronomical infrastructure capable of actually imaging the accretion onto SMBHs, and the training potential of a group with four postdocs, plus participation in an international collaboration, the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, with more than 300 members that comprises most of the worldwide expertise in black hole physics, accretion onto black holes, jet formation, and VLBI imaging in its most challenging configurations.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "The role of angular momentum in galaxy evolution: A study of neutral gas in isolated galaxies with Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinders"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

The interdisciplinary team AMIGA (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía - CSIC) plays a major role in the SKA international project, a next generation radio telescope which will be the largest scientific infrastructure on Earth, generating data at a rate comparable to the entire present day internet bandwidth. The PI of this position coordinates the Spanish participation in the SKA, with her team strongly involved in preparatory science and in developing a Prototype SKA Regional Centre (SRC), in order to produce first class science with SKA and its precursors. She has mentored a total of 6 PhD theses, 19 postdocs and 7 other staff. Thus, this project provides a unique opportunity for a PhD candidate to become deeply involved in SKA, that will be the world’s leading radio astronomy observatory capable of delivering Nobel-class scientific outcomes over the coming decades. The proposed project falls into the core of AMIGA science, which focuses on comparing the properties of galaxies in extreme environments, with a special emphasis on atomic gas (HI) as a tracer of interactions, in which AMIGA has a unique expertise in Spain, well recognized at international level. The main AMIGA sample consists of about 700 highly isolated galaxies in the nearby Universe, acting as a reference for how galaxies evolve in the absence of external influences. A fundamental, but little studied, property in regulating the gas content and star formation in galaxies is their angular momentum (e.g. Obreschkow+2016, Lutz+ 2018). In the existing studies there are almost no isolated galaxies by the strict AMIGA criteria, while they are expected to show significantly different properties from galaxies in any other environment, given their little chances along their history to interchange angular momentum with external companions. This in-depth study is hence crucially missing, and constitutes the research context of the proposed PhD work.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "LABORATORY STUDIES OF LIGHT SCATTERING BY DUST PARTICLES: REVEALING THE PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION, STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DUST"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Gas and dust disks around protostars are the precursors of planetary systems. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain grain growth from μm-sized dust to pebbles and planetesimals, leading to transitional disks and planetary systems with debris disks. These theories need now to be confirmed by observations combined with laboratory measurements of light scattering by dust particles. The distribution of μm-sized grains in protoplanetary disk envelopes and in optically thin debris disks can be traced by optical and near-IR observations of scattered starlight. The angular dependence of the intensity (the phase function) and of the degree of linear polarization (DLP) of scattered light carry information about grain size, structure and composition. Large grains produce a narrow peak in forward scattering, but detecting it is difficult. At intermediate angles, the phase function also depends on grain composition and structure, implying that spherical shape, which shows a unique phase function, is a poor assumption. The phase function of the dust rings surrounding Fomalhaut and HR4796A increases with angle at side- and back-scattering, suggesting particles as large as 100 μm. Compact spherical particles of that size are however incompatible with the observed DLP. This suggests large fluffy aggregates made of μm-sized monomers. However, numerical and experimental simulations still fail at delivering the complete picture. The number of such challenging cases is growing, as high-contrast imaging polarimeters (e.g. VLT/SPHERE, Gemini/GPI) have delivered dozens of high-quality images in the past 5 years, and upcoming observatories (JWST, WFIRST, ELT) will continue to provide such data. In order to maximize the scientific return from these multi-wavelength photopolarimetric observations, and to feed models with physical parameters constraining planet formation theories, new laboratory measurements of the phase function and DLP of representative dust analogues are crucial.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Space-borne solar magnetic field measurements"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

The Solar Physics Group (SPG) of the Solar System Department of the IAA-CSIC is a leading team in the field of solar physics. The SPG participates in the development and construction of space- and balloon-borne solar instrumentation for the Solar Orbiter, Lagrange and Sunrise missions, besides of carrying out state-of-the-art theoretical and observational research on solar magnetism. SPG leads the Spanish Space Solar Physics Consortium (S3PC), which includes four more institutes (INTA, IDR-UPM, UV, and IAC). After having developed IMaX (Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment) for the Sunrise I and II mission flights and co-led (with MPS, Göttingen) the development of SO/PHI (Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager) for the ESA’s Solar Orbiter mission, S3PC is building TuMag (Tunable Magnetograph) and co-leading the development of SCIP (Sunrise Chromospheric Infrared Polarimeter) for the Sunrise III mission flight. Moreover, it is involved in the pre-development phase of PMI (Polarimetric and Magnetic Imager) for the ESA’s Lagrange mission, InFact (Inversion Factory), an electronic inverter of the radiative transfer equation for the American Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, and participates in the first development phases of three tunable band imagers for the European Solar Telescope. SO/PHI was successfully launched aboard Solar Orbiter in February 2020 and it is now in its cruise phase to the Sun after a successful commissioning. SO/PHI will be the first-ever instrument to provide measurements of solar magnetic fields at different angular spacings from Earth and very close to the Sun. SO/PHI, therefore, opens up a window of opportunity for unique science when the cruise phase ends in November 2021. At the same time, Sunrise III fight is scheduled for the summer of 2022. Sunrise is the first observatory that will measure surface magnetic fields with polarimeters at the ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths simultaneously and with unprecedented spatial resolutions.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "The closest habitable exoplanets to Earth"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

We study planetary systems and their stars. In the last years, the community has focused on very small stars because of the great interest they present for the discovery of habitable exo-Earths. Therefore, we work in all possible aspects of these systems, from the general statistics and physics of the formation and evolution of exoplanets and their atmospheres to the internal structure of their stars. To this aim, our group has led the construction of CARMENES, an instrument the first of its kind worldwide, currently is in operation at CAHA observatory. The group includes people with experience in theory, observations, instrumentation and management and is well known in its line of research. The closest stellar neighbour to our Sun is Proxima Centauri. Proxima is not a solar-type star, but a small M dwarf, that is, low mass and the most abundant type of stars in our Galaxy and the nearest in distance to our Sun. Therefore, they deserve much more attention, on their own right. This will, in turn, result in a deeper understanding of this type of object and of any exoplanet they may host. Furthermore, in the past few years, we have moved from perceiving the M dwarfs as isolated systems to knowing that, according to our current understanding, there may be more planets than stars in our Galaxy, which implies a change of paradigm. This has taken us from having to study the stars alone to having to understand the complete stellar system formed by the star and their planets. To do so, we now need to know with sufficient precision the parameters and internal structure of the host stars and understand the physical processes behind their variability, the formation and dynamics of planets around them, any possible interaction between planets and their stars and the evolution in time of the whole system. We can even start characterizing their atmospheres in search for signatures of life! The main objective of our project is searching for habitable Earth-like exoplanets around M-dwarf stars.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "The high-resolution radio view of Luminous Infrared Galaxies: towards the Square Kilometre Array"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Understanding the star-formation (SF) and mass assembly history of the Universe is one of the main challenges of astronomy, as they are key to explaining how galaxies form and evolve. Radio observations provide a unique tool to unveil SF across cosmic time because radio emission is not obscured by dust. With the construction of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) in the coming years, radio astronomy will enter a new era of high-sensitivity and high-resolution large surveys dedicated to solving this challenge. In preparation for this, we can now use the SKA pathfinders e-MERLIN and LOFAR arrays, the only instruments providing angular resolution comparable to the future SKA at the same wavelengths. To be prepared to exploit the science enabled by the SKA we first need to understand the physics of similar local objects. Our team participates and leads the e-MERLIN legacy project LIRGI (Luminous InfraRed Galaxy Inventory), which has observed a sample of the most luminous nearby infrared galaxies, with SF rates, gas and radiation densities similar to galaxies at higher redshift. The project will bring the scientific and technical background needed to design a future SKA Key Science Programs to trace the SF and galaxy assembly history for the majority of the observable galaxies in the Universe LIRGI is an international project with strong leadership from the IAA: Miguel Ángel Pérez-Torres, co-PI of LIRGI, and Antxon Alberdi, both senior researchers at the IAA-CSIC, are experts of the field with decades of observational experience and 100+ refereed publications. The team includes Javier Moldón, a postdoc with extensive radio interferometry experience and developer of the data processing tools required for this project. They are members of the SKA Extragalactic Continuum Science Working Group. Moldón is also part of the team developing a SKA Regional Centre prototype (SRC) at the IAA, which is one of the goals of the Severo Ochoa Project at the IAA.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Computer Science and physical properties of minor bodies"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Until the mid-2000's, the study of the physical properties of the minor bodies in our solar system was done using ground-based and space observations. In the last 20 years, large observational surveys, with a variety of targets (from observational cosmology to stellar astrophysics) have produced a plethora of data. Among these are observations of minor bodies, usually deemed as contamination to the main survey objective, but that are, nonetheless, very appreciated by the community. As a by-product of the processing pipelines, sometimes, the minor bodies are marked and identified and catalogues are published. One of the first, and most productive, of these catalogues was the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Moving Object Catalogue. This catalogue lists astrometric and photometric data for moving objects. One advantage of these kind of data is that, sometimes, they are ready to use in the databases where the survey’s team applied the pipeline to extract the data from the observations. Other source of data are the regular ground-based observations. These are observations planned with diverse objectives, for example the morphology of a galaxy, or the metallicity of an open stellar cluster, and a minor body can be found in the background because of its movement. We want to extract this information as well. We have expertise on determining rotational periods, shapes, and pole direction on minor bodies. Noteworthy, we participated in the discovery of the rings around the centaur Chariklo and Haumea. Furthermore, using the observations mentioned above for selected minor bodies, our group was able to identify the 3D shape of Varuna, to analyse the presence of rings around centaurs, to create a database of absolute magnitudes that can be converted to diameters, to search for new unidentified objects, to the discovery of active asteroids, and to the study of many more physical properties. This work is the perfect combination on combining computer science and planetary science.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "3D Sonification"

Deadline: February, 4th 2021

Over the past decade, there has been an emerging research interest in converting astronomical phenomena into sound. Sonification is a technique that uses data as a source to generate sounds from their transformation and its considered the counterpart of visualization. Two of the main primary goals of the effort of sonification of astronomical data are making astronomy accessible to everybody (researchers included) who are blind or visually impaired, and investigating if sound can enable a more efficient way or a deeper understanding of the data. In this PhD project we will focus on exploring the best approaches to sonify Integral Field Spectroscopy data, also called 3D spectroscopy, packed in datacubes with 2D spatial information and a third 1D spectral axis, as well as their hyperdimensional products derived from its analysis. The candidate will use raw and processed data from surveys such us CALIFA, MaNGA or SAMI. This is an exploratory endeavor on the best practices to convey the power of these rich datasets to the general audience for educational and outreach purposes by using all available sonification techniques, from audification to parametric mapping or model-based sonifications. The final audio examples will be integrated in powerful animations and will be tested on different audiences to assess their effectivity. 3D sonification is under the umbrella of the CosMonic and Astroaccesible projects lead by Dr. Rubén García-Benito and Dr. Enrique Pérez-Montero, respectively, both researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía. CosMonic is a sonification project with broad interest exploiting sound for analysis, artistic or pedagogical purposes and has produced a number of products for the inclusive astronomy project Astroaccesible which aims to emphasize the dissemination of astronomy to blind and low vision people by putting within their reach concepts and descriptions of the nature of our Universe that are understandable far beyond their visual perception.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA ENGINEER POSITION: "Mechanical engineer & quality assurance for aerospace instrumentation"

Deadline: January, 21st 2021

IAA-CSIC offers an engineer contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the field of: - Mechanical engineering, - finite element method (thermal and mechanical), - knowledge in aerospace instrumentation, - and quality assurance.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA ENGINEER POSITION: "Miniaturised power converter modules for interplanetary missions"

Deadline: January, 21st 2021

IAA-CSIC offers an engineer contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the field of the design of power supplies for space applications. Candidates should have a good familiarity with ESA missions’ characteristics and requirements, expertise in the development of power supplies and their characterization through the design of tests (electrical, functional, electromagnetic compatibility and so on) and test equipment like electronics ground support equipment.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Detection and characterization of planetary systems"

Deadline: November, 30th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line “Towards the understanding of the planetary systems”, within the framework of the CARMENES project. CARMENES is aimed at detecting terrestrial temperate exoplanets around small red stars with the radial velocity technique to characterize the planetary system as a whole, including its star and circumstellar environment. The research activity under the proposed contract will focus in the IAA responsibility for the immediate exploitation of the CARMENES survey, its Legacy-Plus project and the instrumental upgrade of CARMENES, together with the follow-up of NASA's TESS mission. The candidate will also have the opportunity to engage in the Phase B activities for the instrument HIRES/ELT.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Minor bodies as tracers of planetary atmospheres enrichment"

Deadline: November, 18th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Physical studies on minor bodies

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Machine Learning and Big Data applied to astronomical surveys, classification, and image processing"

Deadline: November, 18th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Stellar Systems and Galactic Centre, led by E. Alfaro and R. Schoedel, respectively.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "On the evolution of XELGs from J-PAs data"

Deadline: November, 18th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of “Galaxy evolution and Cosmology”.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA ENGINEER POSITION: "Integral Field Spectroscopy instrumentation"

Deadline: November, 18th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers an engineer contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the field of Integral Field Spectroscopy and reinforce the IAA capabilities in the optical design and fibres of astrophysical instruments. The candidate will be involved in the feasibility study (FS) of the GAMAICA instrument for the 3.5 Calar Alto telescope, in particular in the design of the fiber and optics In case the instrument is not selected after the FS phase, the candidate will be integrated in other instrumentation projects at the IAA, including the new instrument for CAHA to be selected after the FS.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA ENGINEER POSITION: "Deploying Open Science Services and science domain tools on the protoSRC platform at IAA "

Deadline: November, 18th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers an engineer contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Enhanced Science infrastructure and research capabilities, and in particular in the development of a prototype SKA Regional Centre.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PHD POSITION: "Interpretation of the infrared lines from starburst galaxies based on photoionization models"

Deadline: October, 27th 2020

A four-year PhD contract is offered in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa” at IAA-CSIC. The selected candidate is expected to carry out her/his activity in the research line of Galaxy Evolution and Cosmology. Supervisor: Enrique Pérez Montero (epm@iaa.es). The candidate will incorporate to the "Estallidos de formación estelar en galaxias/Starbursts in galaxies" group in the IAA-CSIC. The research activity of the Estallidos group is devoted to the study of galaxies hosting very massive episodes of star formation both in the local and the young Universe,deriving new information that helps to describe in detail the properties of the host galaxies and the interplay between massive stars and the interstellar medium. There is a large amount of available and incoming observational data for this kind of objects coming from different facilities at various spectral ranges. In particular, IR range is going to become very relevant to study the high-redshift regime in the optical and the upcoming facilities in the next decade that will largely increment the amount of data in the near and mid-infrared for both local and distant galaxies (e.g. EMIR in GTC, JWST, ALMA...). For this reason, it is timely and necessary to put more efforts in the theoretical and computational interpretation of all the available data following previous work making use of photoionization models to compute all the relevant physical quantities and extract new conclusions.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PHD POSITION: "Formation and evolution of lenticular galaxies and their environment"

Deadline: October, 27th 2020

A four-year PhD contract is offered in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa” at IAA-CSIC. The selected candidate is expected to carry out her/his activity in the research line of Galaxy Evolution and Cosmology. Supervisor: Jaime Perea (jaime@iaa.es) The proposed research refers to the field of galaxy formation and evolution by means of observations at different wavelenght ranges, numerical simulations, and statistical inference using Machine Learning applied to large astronomical datasets. The thesis topic will cover the study of the formation of lenticular galaxies through gravitational interaction or merger of late type galaxies. The Project is to be developed within an important national and international collaboration, participating in several observational projects that involve top-level ground-based facilities such as Calar Alto, GTC, MeerKAT or the VLA. Access is granted to the powerful computing resources needed for the simulations.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PHD POSITION: "Inversion of spectral cubes from airglow spectrographs"

Deadline: October, 27th 2020

A four-year PhD contract is offered in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa” at IAA-CSIC. The selected candidate will carry out her/his activity in the research line of advanced software tools for IAA instrumentation, scientific exploitation and modelling. Supervisors: M. García Comas and M.J. López González (maya@iaa.es, mariajose@iaa.es). Monitoring from the surface is an indispensable tool for detecting the impact of climate change on the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere (MLT) of the Earth in support of space instrumentation" (NFS's Geospace Science Program, 2016). Airglow instruments provide continuous high precision MLT observations and allow the identification of MLT variations at multiple time scales, the study of atmospheric dynamics and the determination of biases in measurements from space. Moreover, the current satellite fleet that observes the MLT, aging and in cases even disappearing, coupled with the lack of funding by space agencies to launch new satellites will inevitably lead to an observational gap from space. In that context, surface measurements will be essential to merge the current space probe databases with future ones. To cover these aspects, the IAA-CSIC is currently developing the high-resolution Multi-spectral Imager of the Mesopause Airglow spectrometer (MIMA), designed to take up to 400 daily images of airglow spectra and provide regional temperature maps of the MLT. Its goals are: 1) to identify early signs of climate change; 2) to study coupling and multi-temporal atmospheric variability; and 3) to serve for correction of instrumental drifts and fusion of discontinued multi-satellite measurements. MIMA is expected to relieve SATI at the OSN as the only instrument of this type in Spain. It will operate for at least one solar cycle as part of a global cooperation program for monitoring the MLT, namely the Network for the Detection of the Mesopause Change (NDMC). From the volume of its airglow spectral cubes (space2D+frequency), we will derive temperature fields, for which it is necessary to develop reliable and efficient retrieval algorithms. We will also investigate the time and space variability of temperatures in order to improve our understanding of atmospheric waves.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PHD POSITION: "Magnetic interaction of planets with M stars using radio techniques"

Deadline: October, 27th 2020

A four-year PhD contract is offered in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa” at IAA-CSIC. The selected candidate will carry out her/his activity in the research line of The Understanding of Planetary Systems, working on the study of star-planet interaction in M stars, mainly by means of radio observations. Supervisors: Miguel Ángel Pérez Torres and Jose Luis Ortiz (torres@iaa.es, ortiz@iaa.es) M stars are the most abundant type of stars in our galaxy. Due to their low mass and other characteristics, they are ideal for searching Earth-type planets. The finding of a planet in the habitable zone of the dwarf M star Proxima Centauri has represented a major breakthrough in exoplanetary science, especially because the mass and size of the planet is likely similar to that of Earth and other Earth-like planets will be found around numerous M stars in the future thanks to several ongoing surveys such as the CARMENES survey at Calar Alto observatory. We propose a PhD project where the successful candidate will become familiar with radio observation techniques, as well as with physics of planets and ultracool dwarf stars.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Composition of exoplanetary atmospheres: modelling and observations"

Deadline: April, 13th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two-year postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa” which comprises an strategic research line devoted to study the physico-chemical conditions that determine the neutral and ionospheric composition of exoplanetary atmospheres. This topic also encompasses radiative transfer calculations to obtain synthetic spectra for planning observations or to retrieve information from archival data. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in both of the research lines stated above.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Identification and characterization of galaxy populations in the J-PAS survey"

Deadline: April, 8th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two-year postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Galaxy Evolution. In particular, the candidates will work in the scientific exploitation of the data from the J-PAS survey (http://www.j-pas.org/) and within the Galaxy Evolution science working group of the J-PAS collaboration, and Dra. Rosa González Delgado.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA ENGINEER POSITION: "Polarization of light"

Deadline: April, 8th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two-year engineer position in the framework of the “Severo Ochoa” Project. The applicant is expected to work in the field of polarization of light in the laboratory and reinforce the IAA capabilities in the optical design of astrophysical instruments. The work will be carried out under the umbrella of the Solar Physics Group (SPG) of the Solar System Department of the IAA. The SPG participates in the development and construction of space and balloon borne solar instrumentation for the Solar Orbiter, Lagrange and Sunrise missions and is a leading institution in the field of solar physics.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Detection and characterization of exoplanetary systems and characterization of their stars"

Deadline: April, 8th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two-year postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Planetary Systems.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Integrating the IAA SRC prototype into the first global network of SRC prototypes and developing an SKA Regional Centre archive"

Deadline: April, 8th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a a two-year postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Enhanced Science infrastructure and research capabilities, and in particular in the development of a prototype SKA Regional Centre.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Postdoctoral researcher with experience in the analysis of very-high-energy gamma-ray data from Cherenkov arrays"

Deadline: April, 7th 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two-year postdoctoral contract in the framework of the “Severo Ochoa” Project of the Institute. The researcher is expected to carry out their activity in the “Galaxy Evolution and Cosmology” research line of the project. In particular, the researcher will work in the wake of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Group of the IAA-CSIC. The CTA Group at the IAA-CSIC includes five astrophysicists and two software engineers from three different scientific departments at the institute. The group develops different scientific research lines for the study of blazars and relativistic jets in AGN, SNE/SNR, GRBs, and other transient sources including those related to the emission of gravitational waves, from a multi-spectral-range and a multi-messenger perspective. The participation of the IAA-CTA in CTA also involves the development of new software for data analysis of CTA in general, and LST in particular.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Characterization of escaping exo-atmospheres through observations and modelling"

Deadline: March, 31st 2020

IAA-CSIC offers a two years postdoctoral contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Planetary Systems.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: " Understanding how exoplanets are born, how they mature and how they survive the death of their star"

Deadline: February, 4th 2020

CARMENES consortium and instrument study planetary systems and their stars. We focus on very small stars because of the great interest they present for the discovery of habitable exo-Earths. To this aim, our group built CARMENES, an instrument, the first of its kind worldwide, currently in operation at CAHA observatory, to detect habitable exoplanets. The closest stellar neighbour to our Sun is Proxima Centauri, a small M dwarf, the most abundant type of stars in our Galaxy and the nearest in distance to our Sun. We know that, according to observations, most of them host planetary systems. To understand them better, we need to accurately determine the parameters and internal structure of the host stars and understand the physical processes behind their variability and the formation and dynamics of planets around them. Most exciting is to learn about the evolution in time of the whole system. Stars form from enormous clouds of gas and dust. However, we do not know yet if their planets form from the same cloud, once it has collapsed to form a disk orbiting the star, or by coagulation of the dust into larger rocks to form the core of planets. We do not know well where they form within the disk or how they migrate to form the mature, close-in systems that we observe. This is due, mainly, to the fact that there are extremely few detections of protoplanets with the RV technique, which would provide accurate minimum masses and orbital parameters for these objects. At the other end of the star’s life, we have not detected yet exoplanets around white dwarfs (WDs), the final fate of stars like our Sun. Their detection would probe the evolution of planetary systems during the late stellar evolutionary phases to learn about the fate of our own Solar System. Searches using the classical RV monitoring are hampered by the shape of the light (the spectrum) emitted by these stars. However, material falling onto the WD from an orbiting debris disk produces signatures that make this RV monitoring possible.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "The role of angular momentum in galaxy evolution: A study of neutral gas in isolated galaxies with Square Kilometre Array pathfinders"

Deadline: February, 4th 2020

AMIGA (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies) is an interdisciplinary team at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía playing a major role in the SKA international project, a next generation radio telescope which will be the largest scientific infrastructure on Earth, and output data at a rate comparable to the entire present day bandwidth of the internet. The PI of this position coordinates the Spanish participation in the SKA, while her AMIGA team is strongly involved in preparatory science and in developing a Precursor SKA Regional Centre (SRC), an environment to provide access and resources to exploit data from SKA and its precursors. She has mentored a total of 6 PhD theses, 17 postdocs and 7 other staff. Thus, AMIGA provides an exceptional opportunity, unique in Spain, for a PhD candidate to become deeply involved in SKA, a facility that will be transformational for radio astronomy over the coming decades. The proposed project falls into the core of AMIGA science, which focuses on comparing the properties of galaxies in extreme environments, with a special emphasis on atomic gas (HI) as a tracer of interactions, in which AMIGA has a unique expertise in Spain. The main AMIGA sample consists of about 700 highly isolated galaxies in the nearby Universe, acting as a reference for how galaxies evolve in the absence of external influences. A fundamental, but little studied, property in regulating the gas content and star formation in galaxies is their angular momentum (e.g. Obreschkow+2016, Lutz+ 2018). It may act as a hidden variable in scaling relations between optical properties (e.g. diameter or luminosity) and HI mass, and could potentially explain why such relations have considerable scatter. In the existing studies there are almost no isolated galaxies by the strict AMIGA criteria, hence an in-depth study of the angular momenta of isolated galaxies is crucially missing, and this constitutes the research context of the proposed PhD work.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Searching Planetary Systems in Death Suns"

Deadline: February, 4th 2020

The search for planetary systems around stars other than the Sun (i.e., exoplanets) has become one of the major topics in modern Astrophysics. The exoplanet research group at the IAA has led the construction of CARMENES, a spectrograph currently in operation at the 3.5m telescope of the CAHA Observatory specially designed to “hunt” exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars in the habitability zone. One of the main objectives of the Severo Ochoa program at the IAA is the scientific exploitation of CARMENES to detect a whole population of exoplanets and to characterize their atmospheres. Exoplanets have been found around many different types of stars, with biases depending on the detection method towards giant planets (photometric transits), planets in close orbits (radial velocity studies of Sun like stars), and planets in the habitable zone (radial velocity studies of M dwarf stars). Only exoplanets around white dwarfs, the final fate of low- and intermediate-mass stars including our Sun, are missing so far. Theoretical models predict the survival of planetary systems through the evolution of these stars along the red giant phases and during the short-lived planetary nebula phase. White dwarfs with gaseous debris disks are very promising candidates to host planetary systems whose detection would probe the relevant parameters for the late survival of planets to investigate the final fate of our own Solar System.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "Remote visualization of 3D radioastronomical Big Data for SKA Regional Centres"

Deadline: February, 4th 2020

The AMIGA team at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA) is an interdisciplinary group actively involved in the SKA (Square Kilometre Array), a next generation radio telescope which will be the largest scientific infrastructure on Earth and will deliver 600PB/yr to a network of SKA Regional Centres (SRCs). The SRCs will provide access to SKA data and resources for their exploitation. The PI of this position (LVM) coordinates the Spanish participation in the SKA, with strong support from J. Garrido (JG, coadvisor of the proposed Project), and her team is involved at both scientific and technical levels. AMIGA complements fundamental science with applied e-Science research, aiming to enhance scientific work, transparency and Open Science. The team contributes to the development of standards for the Virtual Observatory (VO) and is a member of the ESCAPE H2020 project, aiming to address the Open Science challenges shared by ESFRI facilities. The group participated in the SKA Science Data Processor design, contributing to the SKA Preservation and Delivery subsystems. AMIGA also participates in the European SRC design (AENEAS H2020 project) and LVM is nominated by the Ministry to represent Spain in the international SRC Steering Committee. She leads the development of a Precursor SKA Regional Centre at IAA. LVM has mentored 6 PhD theses and 17 postdocs and 7 other staff. AMIGA provides a unique opportunity in Spain for a PhD candidate to become involved in SKA and the SRCs. The large size of the SKA data (2TB-112TB/data product) will change how science is done, moving to a new paradigm where scientists can no longer download data. New research on visualization of 3D radio data is needed, since the existing implementation of hierarchical tiling of sky regions in the VO ecosystem (HiPS IVOA standard) lacks interactivity and cannot be used for scientific analysis unless the data is downloaded. This constitutes the research context of the PhD work.

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INPhINIT Incoming PhD: "A fault-tolerant computing architecture for a space weather mission "

Deadline: February, 4th 2020

The IAA’s Solar Physics Group (SPG) is a dynamic research group formed by scientists and engineers from many disciplines whose main scientific interests root in solar spectropolarimetry and magnetic fields from three points of view: theoretical, observational, and instrumental. Investigations and developments are carried out on: · the structure and physical nature of photospheric magnetic structures like plage and network flux tubes, the umbra, the penumbra, the moat of sunspots, and the internetwork magnetic fields, as well as on the magnetic coupling of the various atmospheric layers of the Sun; · the design, development, and construction of solar instrumentation for space missions and stratospheric balloons: PHI instrument for Solar Orbiter and IMaX, IMaX+ and SCIP instruments for Sunrise. · the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for polarized light in the presence of magnetic fields, in order to work out the sensitivities of the Stokes spectrum on the various physical quantities of the solar photosphere. Of relevance to this project is our development of an electronic inverter of the RTE and a compression core for sending the data to ground. The present proposal builds upon this development. The SPG is currently working on pre-developments for the Polarimetric and Magnetic Imager instrument (PMI) which will be boarded on the Lagrange mission (ESA). If approved, the SPG will have co-PI responsibility for developing the whole Electronic Unit and harness of PMI. In the harsh environment of Lagrange, we cannot use common commercial-off-the-shelf processors due to radiation problems and to power limitations. The combination of state-of-the-art, radiation tolerant devices like ASIC or FPGA becomes almost mandatory. The computing architecture embedded within those devices must be specifically designed to deal with a particular problem, therefore they will have be tailored to each stage of processing, which implies a great design and validation effort.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PhD POSITION: "Modelling non-LTE IR emissions of exo-atmospheres: Interpretation of JWST spectra"

Deadline: November, 7th 2019

IAA-CSIC offers a four years PhD contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of planetary system. Supervisor: M. López-Puertas (puertas@iaa.es). The large number of exoplanets known to date (>4000) lead to their study in a systematic way, e.g., their characterization, how do they form and how they evolve. Part of its study is the characterization of their atmospheres, which is key for studying their origin and evolution. That is, one of the major fields of research in exoplanets nowadays is the connection between atmospheric compositions and formation. Important advances about atmospheric composition have been carried out recently, both from space and ground-based observations. Next major step forward is expected from JWST observations, where the moderate resolution (R~2700) at near and mid-infrared is expected to advance significantly the characterization of the atmospheres. The work proposed falls in this context. Several groups have developed retrievals codes in preparation for JWST measurements analysis. So far, no non-LTE study is being carried out, even though non-LTE is expected to be important, principally in the eclipse emission measurements, as have been shown for the Earth’s atmosphere and for some exoplanets. Ultimately, the proposed non-LTE modelling will be a module of a more general retrieval code that we at IAA plan to develop.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PhD POSITION: " High angular resolution studies of recently detected star clusters at the Galactic Centre - the initial mass function in extreme environments"

Deadline: November, 7th 2019

IAA-CSIC offers a four years PhD contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of starts formation in the Milky Way and Local Universe. Supervisor: R. Schödel (rainer@iaa.es). In the GALACTICNUCLEUS survey we have recently been able to confirm the presence of young stars (< 30 Myr) throughout the nuclear disk of the Milky Way, within 100 pc of the central black hole (Nogueras-Lara et al., subm. to Nature Astronomy), via an analysis of the K-band luminosity function. This agrees with the prediction from ionising radiation and three detected Cepheids (Matsunaga et al. 2011) that there must be at least a dozen so far undetected young clusters hidden in the high density background of the Galactic Centre - in adddition to the known massive young clusters (Arches, Quintuplet, central parsec). Due to the extreme and spatially highly variable (on scales of 1”) interstellar extinction toward the Galactic Centre, these clusters have remained undetected so far. Thanks to our work on proper motions, by combining GALACTICNUCLEUS with the HST Paschen Alpha survey (and new data that we are (obtaining with VLT/HAWK-I), we are now able to pinpoint the location of these clusters via proper motion measurements (work of B. Shahzamanian, postdoc in the IAA GC Group).

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PhD POSITION: "Jets, Accretion and Magnetic Fields Around Supermassive Black Holes at the Centers of Galaxies"

Deadline: November, 7th 2019

The IAA-CSIC offers a 4 year PhD contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in research line: Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology and Black Holes Accretion. Supervisor: Iván Agudo (iagudo@iaa.es) Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are the most energetic objects known so far, and are produced by the fall of gas at the center of some galaxies towards their central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Among the large diversity of known AGN, there is a fundamental difference between radio-emitting AGN and non-radio-emitting AGN, the first being those that produce powerful relativistic jets of magnetized and highly energized plasma. These jets in AGN are propelled along the rotation poles of the accretion disk-SMBH system. One of the most exotic types of radio loud AGN is blazars, a class defined by the extreme variability of its non-thermal radiation from radio wavelengths to the highest gamma-ray energies. The remarkable properties of blazars include apparent superluminal motions up to ~ 50 times the speed of light, extreme changes in total flux and linear polarization on time scales of up to minutes, and extremely variable gamma-ray luminosities that may exceed those of other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum in up to 3 orders of magnitude. In blazars, the relativistic jets emit most of their radiation (and point) at an angle of <10º with regard to the line of sight, which makes them to shorten their time scales of variability to give blazars the remarkable properties by which they are known. Other types of radio-loud AGN include radio galaxies, with jet viewing angles >> 10º, that display much longer time scales of variability, and much less luminous emission at all ranges of the spectrum. At these radio wavelengths, relativistic jets in radio galaxies are visible in their entirety from the innermost scales near the central SMBH, to distances that even frequently exceed the size of the host galaxy. This PhD project is guided by the motivation to answer some of the main current questions in the field of AGN research, i.e.: a) What are the properties of the environment near the central supermassive black hole (accretion flow)? Why do some AGN produce jets and others not? b) What particle acceleration mechanisms capable of keeping jets in AGN collimated until such long distances are predominant? What is the composition (e--e+ or e--p+) of those jets? c) What is the region of production of gamma-ray flares? What is their dominant very-high-energy emission mechanism? To attach these questions, a combination of astronomical observations and numerical simulations will be carried out for the interpretation of the multi-wavelength emission (at all available spectral range from very high energy gamma rays to radio), and linear and circularly polarized millimeter emission in a set of different AGN and in Sgr A * (the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way). With this, the student will infer the structure of the magnetic fields in the plasmas responsible for the emission, the composition of the plasmas, the emission models in all the ranges of the spectrum, and the density and magnetic field of the surrounding interstellar material.

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA PhD POSITION: "Tomography of solar photospheric magnetic fields using Solar Orbiter"

Deadline: November, 7th 2019

IAA-CSIC offers a four years PhD contract in the framework of the Project “Severo Ochoa”. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of solar physics. Supervisor: J.C. Del Toro Iniesta (jti@iaa.es) Solar photospheric magnetic fields are currently being monitored from the Earth point of view using ground-based and space-borne observatories. The Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI), a vector magnetograph on board the Solar Orbiter (SO) ESA mission whose launch is scheduled for February 2020, will be the first-ever instrument to provide measurements of solar magnetic fields at different angular spacings from Earth. SO/PHI, therefore, opens up a window of opportunity for unique science. With its two telescopes, a Full Disk Telescope (FDT) and a High Resolution Telescope (HRT), PHI will achieve 2 and 0.3 arcseconds spatial resolution at perihelion (0.3 AU) while providing high sensitivity, full spectropolarimetric measurements. Such vantage points will allow to perform stereoscopic measurements of solar magnetic fields. Stereoscopy is nothing but the three dimensional reconstruction of -in our particular case- magnetic fields, by combining SO/PHI measurements with those from other instruments on or orbiting Earth. The main goal of the study is to investigate the nature of magnetoconvection in the Sun by analyzing the three-dimensional temporal evolution of magnetic fields in different solar scenarios (quiet Sun, active regions and, for the very first time, the solar poles).

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Star formation in the Galactic Centre"

Deadline: October, 17th 2019

There is a new opening for a Severo Ochoa Postdoc position at the IAA, funded by the Severo Ochoa Excellence grant. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Star formation in the Milky Way and Local Universe. This is a two year position with the possibility of extending it for one year. Candidates should have a good familiarity with infrared high angular resolution observations of the Galactic centre; Expertise in stellar proper motion measurements from high angular resolution imaging; Track record of (observational) research on Galactic center science; Excellent knowledge of English

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NEW OPENING FOR A SEVERO OCHOA POSTDOC POSITION: "Milky way stellar streams"

Deadline: October, 17th 2019

There is a new opening for a Severo Ochoa Postdoc position at the IAA, funded by the Severo Ochoa Excellence grant. Candidates are expected to carry out their activity in the research line of Star formation in the MIlky Way and Local Universe. This is a two year position. Candidates should have a PhD in Astrophysics, with experience in the study of resolved stellar populations in galaxies and precision photometry of wide fields.

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