Job offers

  Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas   Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía   Excelencia Severo Ochoa   HR Excellence in Research
Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

High resolution observations of protoplanetary disks by ALMA have brought up the possibility of modeling disks in detail. For instance, the maximum size of the particles within the disk and the opacity as a function of the wavelength can be derived if a model for the grains is assumed. Historically, only spherical grains have been used in these models, just because of simplicity: the scattering matrix and the thermal emission can be easily, analytically derived. Just a few new results have been obtained by using spheroids, which are significantly different from those referred to spheres.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

VHE gamma-ray observations of blazars in last 20 years expanded the horizon of detected sources in number (from ~5 sources to ~80) distance (up to z=0.944) and class (BL Lacs, FSRQ, radio-galaxies). Many crucial questions remain open on the jet physics: processes involved in jet launching and acceleration, role of hadrons, the connection of blazars to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, the location of the site of photon emission in different classes of sources and source states.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

Our solar system beyond Neptune is poorly known. We know about the existence of Pluto, a few other dwarf planets and a myriad of smaller objects collectively known as “Transneptunian Objects”. But because of limitations in the current reach of our largest telescopes we do not know exactly how many of them there are and how far they reach. We do not even know if there is still an additional planet in the solar system to be found or even more than just one planet... But by studying the currently known TNOs and using new techniques we may be able to get some answers to the above questions.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

The large number of exoplanets known to date (>4500) has showed us the rich diversity of both planets and planetary systems. The enormous jump, from knowing just our own Solar System to more than three thousand other systems discovered in only ~25 years, opened a new field of research and posed a major challenge: learning how planets form and how they evolve. To answer those questions it is pivotal to fully characterise them in a systematic way. A key part of such a characterisation process is the study of their atmospheres.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

We are testing different prototypes of a new concept that we call MARCOT in which we integrate “small” telescopes to form a much larger one but with different techniques to the ones used so far to interferometrically link the individual telescopes. Our techniques take advantage of new concepts and new technologies in electronics, optoelectronics and photonic science that are now available. We are currently assessing the feasibility and cost of this approach, which can yield to costs reductions of more than a factor 10 compared to conventional large telescopes.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

The measurement of the concentrations of different types of aerosols in the Earth’s atmosphere is crucial for modeling radiative transfer, advance allergy alerts or manage aviation circulation. This is a kind of the inverse light scattering problem, that has been approached by Machine Learning only for some very simple cases of non-spherical particles, such as spheroids. Non-spherical particles have been widely proved to give radically different results in radiative transfer in different astrophysical scenarios, such as planetary atmospheres and cometary comae.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

Our research group at IAA is focused on the study of black hole accretion and relativistic jet formation through very long baseline interferometric observations (VLBI) with mm-wave arrays, such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), and orbiting antennas, such as the space VLBI mission RadioAstron. In particular our research group is playing a key role in the scientific exploitation of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). Dr.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

The research project is double fold: scientific and biological/technological. On one hand, the scientific goal will be to use the worldwide network of the BOOTES robotic telescopes to detect transient lunar phenomena, to characterise the size, speed, and frequency of these events. The impacts on the moon and their ejecta will threaten any life-support system built on the Moon so this analysis is very important. On the other hand, their biological implications for advanced control systems and habitability on the moon will be studied.

Deadline: Thursday, 2022, January 27

Historically the study of the physical properties of minor bodies in our solar system was done doing planned ground-based observations. In the last 20 years the space telescope also was used to this kind of studies. Telescopes likes Hubble, Spitzer, Wise or Herschel were used. Then, most recently, large ground-based and space-based stars and/or galaxies surveys were planned with diverse objectives but were used by the minor bodies community to study the background minor bodies.